Category Archives: College Planning

The Four Pieces to a Complete College Application

checklistWith one month to go before the November 1st application deadlines that many students are trying to meet, it’s time to review the parts necessary to make an application complete.  For a student’s application to be reviewed, the following items need to arrive at the colleges by or BEFORE the deadline:

1-An Admission Application

2-Financial Aid Applications

3-Official Test Scores

4-School Report/Transcript (and possibly Letters of Recommendation)

1-Students are responsible for submitting a complete (and thoroughly checked) application that may or may not require supplemental essays. This is the most important piece of the application for students to get in on time! Sometimes colleges will give students a short grace period for test scores and recommendations to come in, but not always…so don’t count on it. But they will never accept a late application.

Well before the application deadline, it is wise for students to spend time reviewing every question they are asked to answer on an application, as well as carefully read the “Application Requirements” page on the college’s website. Each college has different preferences and requirements; it’s the student’s job to understand and follow these directions.

If supplemental essays are required, these should not be answered directly in the application, but first researched, reflected on, and drafted in a Word or Google document, then edited and reworked several times. Colleges know they are “a top-ranked institution” and are in sunny California or bustling New York City. Students need to go beyond generic answers and show how the programs and qualities of the college will help them achieve their goals.

Students will also be asked to answer, “What are your first and second choice majors at X College?” Many colleges carefully consider how prepared a student is for their intended major (i.e. if a student selects “Business,” colleges will be looking at the student’s math courses and scores on the SAT or ACT). Students should spend time researching if they will be evaluated based on their major choice, and make sure there are schools on their list that will admit them into their desired program.

Have someone double-check your application. It is easy to miss something when you are anxious about getting a college application turned in; a second set of (calm) eyes can be very helpful! Continue reading

College Factors: What to Let Go and What to Embrace

round silver colored wall clock

 

 

 

It is that time of year when seniors feel that the college process is getting real!

In just two short months, the early application deadline of November 1st will be here, so now is the time to focus on what you have control over and to let go of what you do not.

 

 

Factors outside of your control (recognize these, but then let them go):

-competitiveness of the applicant pool

-a college’s preference for in-state vs. out-of-state applicants

-# and competitiveness of students applying to your major

-needs of the university

-how admissions staff measure the desirability of applicants

-the essay questions you are asked to answer

-competitiveness of your high school

-biological and background factors (race, income, etc.)

-the mood and perspective of your reviewer

Factors within your control (prioritize these, and give them your best effort):

-your course selection

-the quality of your essays and application

-what is on your resume (how you’ve chosen to spend your free time)

-who writes your recommendation letters

-your desired major

-where you apply

-how you engage with colleges

-seeking out resources in your school and community

I could write about all of these in-depth, but today I will focus on quick tips for the things you do have control over. Continue reading

College-Bound High School Timeline

writings in a planner

The Back-to-School sales are in full-swing at Target, so the start of the school year must be around the corner. In between lounging at the pool and enjoying a scenic hike, now is a great time for high school students to set goals for the school year and to map out a few key dates and activities. The following is a year-by-year checklist for freshmen through seniors.

9TH GRADE: LOOK AHEAD

FALL

Start strong. Your freshmen grades do matter! Use this year to identify your strengths and weaknesses in different subjects. Check out Khan Academy for subject-specific help and connect with teachers outside of class.

Get some guidance: meet with a school or community counselor to discuss your class choices and how they support your higher education goals.

Get active: join school or community groups, clubs, or teams you’re interested in.

WINTER

Grades matter (it is worth repeating!) College may seem like a distant goal, but your grades from each year of high school will impact your overall GPA and class rank.

Explore: take advantage of opportunities through your school and in your community to learn about different career fields.

SPRING / SUMMER

Keep track: start documenting your academic, extracurricular and community service achievements and awards. Save this list and add to it as you progress through high school. This will be a big time-saver when completing college applications and creating a resume.

Get involved: volunteer, get a job or sign up for an enrichment program during the summer.

Read and Write. Both skills are very important and require consistent practice, no matter your chosen field. Continue reading

Tips For High School Seniors

senior-unsplashCongratulations to high school seniors on your college acceptances and (hopefully) deciding on your college of choice.  With College Decision Day coming up on May 1st, here are few reminders before you proudly sport your college sweatshirt and officially get Senioritis!

  1. Notify other colleges

Most colleges make it easy to let them know you will not be attending in the fall. By turning down the admission offer, it could open up a spot for someone on the waitlist. It is also professional and nice for you to let colleges and admission officers know you will not be attending. Plus, the colleges should take you off their mailing lists and you’ll stop receiving communications from them that you do not need.

  1. Thank everyone

There are probably many people who helped you sometime during the college admission process. Some of the helpers may include your school counselor, teachers, letter of recommendation writers, coaches, parents, and family members. It was a long process and a lot of people helped. Thank them for their help and let them know where you will be attending in the fall. Let your helpers celebrate your success and future plans.

  1. Submit housing paperwork and deposit

Many colleges have deadlines to get the housing application in to guarantee your housing spot in the fall. Pay attention to the deadlines and submit all required housing documents prior to the deadline. You should also make sure you are honest when filling out the housing questionnaire. It is important for you to answer the questions about who you are and not who you think you are or who you want to be. For example, if you are a little messy, don’t say you are neat. The questions on the housing application will help the housing office match you with a roommate who has similar habits. When students have polar opposites habits, such as sleep patterns, it could cause some conflicts.

  1. Watch your email and mailbox

The college may contact you to request information over the summer. The requests might have deadlines and are sometimes non-negotiable. Therefore, make sure you open every piece of mail and every email from the college to ensure you respond to any request they may have. Missing a deadline or not submitting a requested document could jeopardize your enrollment in the fall.

  1. Update Financial Aid

If any information was incorrect when you filled out the FAFSA, log back in and make changes. In addition, if the college is requesting any financial aid documents, such as tax forms, send in the documents right away. If you’re like many students, the financial aid award letter played a large role in your final college decision. Therefore, make sure the financial aid office has every they need by the date they need it because if they don’t receive everything, your financial aid may be affected. In addition, if your finances have changed, make sure to contact the financial aid office to discuss special circumstances. Continue reading